Saturday, November 12, 2011

Joy Bauer’s Food Cures

gluten-free mini gingerbread muffins

Joy Bauer Food Cures BadgeI recently received a copy of Joy Bauer’s Food Cures. Not only is the book on the New York Times Bestseller list, it is also written by the Today Show’s nutritionist and food expert, Joy Bauer. 

Naturally, the first thing I looked for when I opened the book was the section on celiac disease. By a strange coincidence, my sister-in-law called me later on that day to tell me that my husband’s brother had just been told by his doctor to go off gluten for a month to see if it helped with his chronic stomach problems. She was at the grocery store, suddenly overwhelmed by the fear that she would buy something with gluten that would harm her husband. She read the labels of some of Todd’s favorite foods to me, and I opened the Food Cures book to the section on “avoiding foods that contain gluten.” Even though I’ve been gluten-free for over six years, I’m still not able to be absolutely sure that something is safe. When I’m at the store, I check the list I bring with me (there is also one available at the Mustard Seed customer service desk), just to be sure. So when Jill called, I was happy to have a list in front of me that I could trust. In fact, one of the items that Jill listed, food starch, was on the “maybe” list, so I was able to warn her before she bought it.

A book such as Food Cures practically caters to someone like me, who probably has about half the conditions she describes in her book. All of the diets revolve around the guidelines given in the beginning and in the weight loss section. There is wonderful, encouraging advice in each section, from mood to PMS to IBS. Even when Joy gives common sense guidelines that usually just make me feel guilty because I know these things but still don’t do them, she’s so encouraging and upbeat that you almost want to try to do a little better, just for her.

The only problem I had with the book was that it was difficult
to find all the recipes, as there was no section with just recipes or a recipe index. Although I did find several appealing recipes in the section for celiac disease, such as  gf apple-cinnamon pancakes with lemon yogurt topping and gf gingerbread muffins, I still had to through all of the sections to see if any other recipes interested me.  For example, I had to look under “Mood” to find a lovely recipe for vegetable oatmeal bisque, which also happened to be gluten-free.  However, many of her recipes are also available on her website, which makes finding just the right thing a lot easier.

I would definitely recommend this book to people who want to try to take charge of their relationship with food and find ways to make it work for them. It is particularly useful to people who have just discovered they have a certain condition and need an encouraging person to guide them through the often confusing and intimidating path of food lifestyle changes.

I would definitely recommend this book to people who want to try to take charge of their relationship with food and find ways to make it work for them. It is particularly useful to people who have just discovered they have a certain condition and need an encouraging person to guide them through the often confusing and intimidating path of food lifestyle changes.

Note on the muffins: I used almond yogurt instead of real yogurt, which is why I think they came out a little dry.

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